An occasional blog series where we find cars from around the internet and try to persuade you to buy them… 

What is it?

It’s a Mini…. or at least, it’s MOST of a Mini. It’s missing a bit of length in the floorpan, the doors, windows and roof. It’s AWESOME.

Errr, what?

It’s a Shorty Mini convertible, sort of like a Beach Buggy but made in the UK. We think it looks like a whole heap of fun.

Where did you find it?

It’s for sale on eBay here.

Why buy it?

The seller quite rightly points out that it’d make the perfect promotional vehicle, so why not?

How much is it?

Right now at the time of writing it’s a shade under five hundred quid with five days to go.

Is that a lot?

Erm, who knows? Where this one ends up is anyones guess. We might just have to have a cheeky bid.

But can I fit Powerspark Electronic Ignition?

What, Electronic Ignition for a Classic Mini? that’s bread and butter for Powerspark Ignition!

In fact, if you do buy it, contact [email protected], and we’ll send you some freebies.

Own a Mini and need a distributor, HT leads of an ignition coil? Click the links!

An occasional blog series where we find cars from around the internet and try to persuade you to buy them… 

What is it?

It’s an Aston Martin DB6 Estate Car, of course! Forget the Volvo 240 Torslanda, this is the wagon you want for your winter weeks away.

Errr, what?

Traditional coachbuilders Harold Radford & Co converted 12 of these Aston Martin’s to ‘Shooting Brake’ spec, with 8 in Right Hand Drive and 4 in Left Hand Drive. This one was built NEW as a station wagon, complete with roof rack. It’s done 50,000 original miles and is simply beautiful.

Where did you find it?

For sale with Bonhams Auctions, as part of their August 14th sale. It’s estimate at £ 760,000 – 910,000.

Why buy it?

First of all, to go surfing. Secondly, because it’s super cool, highly exclusive and very unusual. Wouldn’t it just look great with a longboard on the roof at Woolacombe or Croyde Bay? We like the idea and the very antithesis of the utterly preposterous expense of a car with a surfboard on top.

How much is it?

It’s estimated at three-quarters of a million pounds, to a bit under a million, giving quite a large window.

The £150,000 ‘leeway’ in the middle just goes to show that even Bonhams aren’t too sure where the hammer will fall on this car.

Is that a lot?

Who knows? You can’t buy another one.

If you want a DB5 you’ll need somewhere between £600,000 and £900,000 depending on which way the wind is blowing, and a DB6 comes in just a snip less.
An estate, though? We shall find out, and blog about it.

But can I fit Powerspark Electronic Ignition?

Yes of course you can! We’ve done extensive research on this for customers in the past, and our ‘D12 or D62H’ high energy distributor is the one for the job.

This is a Lucas 25D6 based distributor, not too dissimilar to the type used by the Austin Healey.

More photos of the 1966 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Shooting Brake:

An occasional blog series where we find cars from around the internet and try to persuade you to buy them… 

steve coogan e type

What is it?

It’s Steve Coogan’s Jaguar E Type, or at least it was, until yesterday.

Obviously being Alan Partidge’s car, it had to be just right. The TV star bought this (then red) Jaguar E Type after a long search for the perfect Jaaaaag, then had it restored inch-perfectly.

Errr, what?

We’ll break it down carefully… Very early car (one of the first 92 in right hand drive), outside bonnet locks, flat floor, demonstrator model. It was also the first E Type to enter Scotland.

Coogan bought it in recent years, when it was painted red. It was featured in Classic & Sports Car, and at the time the full history and significance of the Jag had just been uncovered. At the end of the article, Coogan hinted that it would be restored to it’s factory original specification.

Where did you find it?

It just sold at Silverstone Auctions online sale, actually.

Why buy it?

In E Type terms, this is about as good as they get.

How much is it?

Interestingly, Silverstone Auctions have now revised the web page so it says ‘undisclosed sum’, but we seem to remember that on Saturday the hammer price was stated as £316,000.

Is that a lot?

In Jaguar E Type terms, yes, but also no. The cost of restoring one of these cars is pretty huge, and this is a very significant car. The estimate against the sale was £300,000 to £350,000, so it hit right in the middle of the guestimate.

Screen Shot 2020-08-03 at 15.56.34

But can I fit Powerspark Electronic Ignition?

We thought you’d never ask! Yes Mr Customer, we would love to fit aftermarket electronic ignition and our own HT leads to your inch-perfect, concours ready, factory original in every way Jaguar E Type.

You’ll be needing a Powerspark 45D6 Electronic Distributor, these L6 HT  Leads and why not go for a Viper ignition coil at the same time?

lucas_45d6

 

 

We had seen Steve Hewitt on some of the classic car Facebook groups, so decided to get in touch and find out more about his build.

Steve has a great YouTube channel, where he’s documenting the process to restore his classic Mini. What’s really interesting is that Steve is painting the car at home, with enamel paint, the old fashioned way. Take a look at his videos and be sure to subscribe by clicking here.

We’ll be sending Steve some Powerspark Ignition goodies for the Mini, like 8mm HT Leads, a fresh distributor and of course a Viper ignition coil.

Further bulletins as events warrant, we look forward to seeing the car on the road!

Purists, avert your eyes! This one isn’t Trimph Red with Black Leather, like the owner tells us it should be… No, this one is painted in Ferrari Rosso Red with Tan Leather interior, and boy does it look fantastic.

Visitors - Triumph TR6

Not only does it look fantastic but it SOUNDS fantastic too. Know why? It’s firing on a Powerspark Electronic Ignition Kit, fitted some 7 years ago and still going strong. In fact, the customer likes the Powerspark kit so much, he popped by to collect a K6 ignition kit for a performance Volkswagen beetle belonging to a friend!

So, what Powerspark equipment does a Triumph TR6 use?

All Triumph TR cars use either a Lucas 25D6 Distributor or a Delco 6 Cylinder.

If your car has a Lucas 25D6 Distributor, then you’ll need our K1 Electronic Ignition Kit.
We also do a complete replacement distributor for the Lucas 25D6, in points or electronic.

If your car has a Delco 6 Cylinder Distributor, then you’ll need our K26 Electronic Ignition Kit. We also do a complete replacement Delco 6 Cylinder distributor.

Triumph TR6 Engine 2

The guys over at Fellows Speed Shop are often in the area, as they buy ignition parts and fuel pumps from Powerspark Ignition. Today they popped by in their ‘shop truck, which houses one of their special secrets… The air cooled flat four is gone, replaced by Subaru power.

Why put a Subaru engine in a classic Volkswagen?

There are a number of reasons to do this, primarily power, drivability, heating, and fuel economy. The four cylinder Subaru engine is generally 30 years newer than the engine it replaces.

Fellows Speed Shop don’t just do engines, they also do big brake conversions… Why not get in touch and see if they can build your dream Volkswagen?

Give them a follow on Facebook or Instagram, they do cool work.

Screen Shot 2020-07-29 at 11.29.51

 

An occasional blog series where we find cars from around the internet and try to persuade you to buy them… 

Austin-Healey-127

What is it?

1964 Austin Healey 3000 in the perfect colour combination.

Errr, what?

A Big Healey, don’t you know, a hairy chested British sportscar, with no roof, from the days when real men drove convertibles and the term ‘hair dressers car’ hadn’t been invented.

Where did you find it?

For sale through a dealer, here.

Why buy it?

If not because it’s one of the most elegant British designs ever made, then because you didn’t buy one 10 years ago when they were half the price. For that reason, you should buy one now, because on that logic in another 10 years these will be £100,000+.

Anyway, it’s a beautiful and very usable classic car.

How much is it?

£64,995 as stated.

Is that a lot?

No, not really. You could always buy this one for £12,500 and spend £50,000 and two years restoring it and then… oh wait, that doesn’t make sense.

But can I fit Powerspark Electronic Ignition?

Absolutely. We do a wide range of products for the Austin Healey, we’d call them best sellers. We can do an ignition kit, a complete distributor, ignition coil and HT leads.

Austin Healey 3000 Complete Distributor
Austin Healey 3000 Electronic Ignition Kit
Austin Healey 3000 Ignition Leads
Austin Healey 3000 Ignition Coil

Seen a car you think we should feature? Email us!

Here’s some more photos of the beautiful car…

 

 

An occasional blog series where we find cars from around the internet and try to persuade you to buy them… 

Screen Shot 2020-07-28 at 13.58.44

What is it?

Thanks for asking, it’s a 1974 Volvo 240DL Estate

Where did you find it?

Browsing the classic car section on eBay, of course.

Why buy it?

Launched in 1974, the Volvo 240is the iconic boxy estate and the undisputed father of the whole estate car movement. Think of the 740, 940, 850, V70 and all the other famous Volvos that follow, well this is great grandad. Respect your elders!

Volvo estates have been enjoying an impressive surge in values and interest, and this one is believed to be the oldest 240 Estate in the country. That makes it cool…. BUT…

It’s not just that. Take a look at the interior, sure, the outside needs a little work but this car harks back to a simpler time, and don’t those red seats just look wonderful?

It’s a couple of weekends work and a very exciting trip to the beach.

How much is it?

At the time of writing, £1,600 with four days to go.

Is that a lot?

It’s hard to say. It clearly needs some work, but the early ones just aren’t around any more. Good late cars are expensive!

Screen Shot 2020-07-28 at 14.13.26

But can I fit Powerspark Electronic Ignition? 

Yes, the Volvo 240 Series uses our K6 Electronic Ignition Kit.

If I buy it, what will Powerspark Ignition give me?

Go on, do a bid, we’ll rustle up some HT leads and an ignition coil for you.

Bought the car and want to claim your prize? Phone Powerspark Ignition on 01527 889 453 and quote the reference ‘I bought that car you told me to buy

Seen a car you think we should feature? Email us!

Here’s some more photos of the car…

Screen Shot 2020-07-28 at 13.58.38

 

Well this was a little treat!

This lovely MG Metro Turbo popped by for a new distributor and ignition module.

Launched at the October 1982 Birmingham Motor Show the MG Metro Turbo went head to head in the marketplace with Ford’s XR2 (launched 1981). The Peugeot 205 GTI would arrive in 1984, and the rest, as they say, is history.

With a quoted bhp of 93, 0–60 mph in 9.9 seconds, and top speed of 112 mph (180 km/h) this car had few direct competitors at the time, although the growing demand for “hot hatches” meant that it soon had a host of competitors including the Ford Fiesta XR2, Peugeot 205 GTI and Renault 5 GT Turbo.

These cars were equipped with electronic ignition from the factory, using a Lucas 65D Distributor. This car uses a Viper coil, along with a Powerspark 65D Distributor and 8mm double Silicone HT Leads. (The same HT leads used by the Mini and Morris Minor.)

Looking for an MG Metro Turbo? Try Car and Classic or eBay… But don’t expect much change from £10,000!

Visitors - Mg Metro Turbo

The MG Metro Turbo was replaced in 1990 by the Rover Metro GTi, with the advanced K series engine delivering more power and delivering it through an end on 5 speed gearbox. Now though the Rover management had decided the MG badge was for genuine sports cars only and already plans and actions were afoot to provide such cars (MGF, are your ears burning?) Thus future performance Rover Metros were to be the GTa and GTi models.

Visitors - MG Metro Turbo 2

 

MG Metro Turbo Technical Specifcation:

Engine:
Number of cylinders: 4
Capacity: 1275 cc
Bore & Stroke: 70.61 mm x 81.28mm
Compression Ratio: 9.4:1
Valve gear: Pushrod overhead valve
Carburation: Single SU HIF44
Turbocharger: Garrett Air Research T3
Max Boost Pressure: 7.5 psi
Max Power: 93 bhp (S 6130 rpm)
Max Torque: 85lb/ft (a 2650 rpm)
Transmission:
Type: 4 speed all synchromesh
Clutch: Single dry plate
Suspension:
Front: Independent bottom link braced by anti roll bar. Top link operating Hydragas spring. Telescopic dampers.
Rear: Independent trailing arms, anti roll bar, coil spring pre loaded on Hydragas unit.
Wheels: Vented cast alloy 13″ diameter, 5.5 J rims
Tyres: Steel braced radial low profile 165/60 VR13.
Brakes: Front – 4 piston calliper ventilated disc. Rear-7″ drum.
Performance:
0-60 mph: 9.9 secs
Max speed: 112 mph
Fuel consumption: 50.3 mpg @ 56 mph (urban)
Top speed: 110mph
0 to 60mph: 9.5 seconds
Average fuel consumption: in a range 30 to 40mpg

Why you should always carry spare parts for your classic car

Posted: June 26, 2020 by goodshoutmedia in News

Here’s a little note sent in by a customer, and a useful reminder as to why it pays to carry some spares.

If you own a classic car, keep a little box in the boot. Inside that you need a coil, a set of HT leads, a spare ignition kit, a distributor cap and a back up points & condenser.

Dear Powerspark Team,

I am extremely grateful to the generosity of your MD Simon Lawther, who attempted to rescue my family from a breakdown in our 1968 Classic Morris Mini Cooper S yesterday Wednesday 24th June.

We were approaching Bromsgrove from Droitwich and on Webb’s island lost power and experienced poor running. We coasted onto the Shell garage forecourt in order to figure out what had happened. Fuel supply was proven ok and nothing looked obviously out of place in the 23D4 distributor – Points ok, rotor arm fine, HT leads looked tight and clean, no cracks in the cap. The coil however was very very hot and this became our main suspect. We tried a water soaked rag to coil it to no avail. With no spare it was time to call the recovery truck.

Simon pulled into the filling station to buy fuel while I was calling the recovery team. With no hesitation he offered straight away to postpone what he was doing and ‘just nip back to work’ to go get me a coil. I pulled the suspect coil off the car and stripped away the front grille in readiness to get into the distributor if needed. I believe in changing only one thing at a time when fault finding. As good as gold, Simon returned directly and offered me his Viper resin core coil replacement and at no charge – what a star!

Simon was in a hurry now and had to leave. We had the new coil installed within just a few minutes. Sadly that did not cure the rough running. Before we could do more the recovery truck arrived, collected the car and bore us all home to Redditch.

On the comfort of my own drive way I was able to give the HT leads a fettle before digging into the distributor to change the condenser – that finally did the trick and smooth running is now restored.

I am sorry this is not quite a story of ‘Viper coil saves the day’, but this is a story of the selflessness and generosity of your MD to whom we are very grateful and through this note would like to share our appreciation and thanks for what he did for us. But we are very pleased now to be sporting the new Viper coil within our engine bay.

Thank you Simon